Artificial Intelligence to Predict the Future

17/08/2021 47

Combine the brain power of millions of people with exponential technologies to proactively predict events before they happen. Science fiction or reality?

It was recently published in The Drive that The Pentagon is experimenting with the use of exponential technologies to proactively predict events before they occur. The North Command of the United States has been conducting tests on a system that combines and analyzes massive data from cloud computing, devices and sensors through Artificial Intelligence. The process is based mainly on the observation, collection and analysis of data in real time and scenarios of what may happen are determined.

Called Global Information Dominance Experiments (GIDE), this system can predict impending events and generate proactive action in seconds. However, although the system can detect potential events, it must be the human who takes the important decisions, determining the actions to be implemented in each case.

This real application clearly illustrates two fundamental concepts that we have introduced earlier on the blog, accelerated convergence and the centaur. Recall that under the accelerated convergence, as technology continues to grow exponentially, interactions between different subgroups of technology will create extremely exciting opportunities.

The Pentagon is experimenting with the use of exponential technologies to proactively predict events before they occur.

In this case, the combinatorial potential of the Internet of Things, cloud computing and Artificial Intelligence with all its derivatives is being used. The second case tells us about the future hybrid of the centaur where humans continue to do what we do best – create, imagine, decide which of our many goals and projects to prioritize in a world of limited resources – while artificial intelligence will assist us in our decision-making. For example, calculating the most likely consequences of specific projected interventions in delicate ecosystems or complex socio-political and economic systems. By better understanding the possible consequences and the range of options, we can make more informed and effective decisions.

The topic of technology and the ability to predict events brings us to the technological concept of computer telepathy. Mark Zuckerberg suggested several years ago that it will soon be possible to capture a thought and share it with the world. The CEO of Facebook has been developing programs related to computer telepathy for several years.

Also experts from The United States Army have been working intensively on programs dedicated to enhancing the intuition or “sixth sense” ability of its troops. Army scientists explained that research on recognition and decision-making patterns suggested that there is such a sixth sense through which humans can detect and act on unique patterns without having consciously and intentionally analyzed them first.

Experts agree that the brain-machine interface will elevate this skill and many others to a much higher level. For example, six scientists from Washington State University in 2019 managed to interconnect three brains to play Tetris with the mind. The system is called BrainNet and it works as a direct collaboration interface between brains.

Mark Zuckerberg suggested several years ago that it will soon be possible to capture a thought and share it with the world.

The researchers published their work in the journal Scientific Reports in Nature and it is expected that in the future it will be of great use in solving complex problems. On BrainNet, Shelly Fan published an article in 2018 on Singularity Hub titled «How BrainNet enabled 3 people to directly transmit thoughts».

In this article, the author explained that sometimes we are not efficient when it comes to finding the correct words to clearly and efficiently transmit our thoughts to another consciousness. Therefore, an alternative would be if we could directly transmit our thoughts through a digital space similar to the Internet to another mind. This brain-to-brain communication would not be subject to the limitations of language translation. A true universal means of communication for humanity.

Current technology is sufficient to develop devices for the rudimentary transmission of information from brain to brain in humans. The system cannot transmit words and thoughts from one person to another. This will be a challenge that we will have to solve in the coming years. Another issue is that current systems work with two or three people. A second challenge is moving from computer telepathy among few people to crowds, allowing many people to interact on a network.

As non-invasive neurotechnologies increase in resolution in both time and space, computer telepathy systems will become more sophisticated. A study using electrodes implanted in four mice showed that they could learn to transmit information in a strange “telephone” set of brain waves, essentially turning brains into an artificial biological network that classified, stored and transferred data.

As non-invasive neurotechnologies increase in resolution in both time and space, computer telepathy systems will become more sophisticated.

In another case, a group of monkeys collaboratively learned to control a prosthetic arm and how to catch a moving ball, performing better than any member of the team. The ultimate goal of these experiments is to combine the brain power of millions of people on the Internet to solve a common problem.

In the coming years we will see more and more projects that combine the brain power of millions of people with expert systems such as the one developed by the Northern command of the United States called Global Information Dominance Experiments (GIDE).